Nogales

Nogales

Mid Elevation Climate Zone

Climate Zone

My town is in the Mid Elevation Climate Zone. This zone consists of high deserts, semi-desert grassland, chaparral and woodlands ranging from 3,500 to 5,000 feet. Annual precipitation ranges from 10 to 20 inches.

Mid Elevation Seasonal Tips

Seasonal Tips

Fall in the mid elevation climate zone is mild, with temperatures cooling significantly from September to November.

  • Adjust irrigation and watering schedule when the temperatures cool, usually in October.
  • Turn off automatic watering systems when it rains, or install a rain sensor to do this automatically.
  • Mulch to protect plants from frost.
  • Winterize plumbing to keep pipes from bursting (typically 20 degrees F. or below).

Winter in the mid elevation climate zone is cool, often with near-freezing temperatures. The last killing frost usually occurs before mid- April.

  • Adjust irrigation and watering schedule for winter temperatures and shorter days.
  • Turn off automatic watering systems when it rains, or install a rain sensor to do this automatically. 
  • To protect your plumbing, wrap any exposed pipes with insulation and disconnect and drain your garden hoses. If a pipe freezes or bursts, shut off the main water valve immediately.

Spring in the mid elevation climate zone is cool to mild and one of the driest times of the year. Temperatures rise from March to May however, there can be killing frosts as late as mid-April.

  • Adjust irrigation and watering schedule for warmer temperatures and plant growth.
  • Apply mulch around the base of plants to conserve moisture and prevent weeds.
  • Turn off sprinklers and postpone watering on windy days to reduce evaporation loss.  

Summer in the mid elevation climate zone is warm to hot, and early summer is one of the driest times of the year.

  • Adjust irrigation and watering schedule for summer temperatures.
  • Collect monsoon rainwater from your roof by installing gutters and downspouts, and direct rainwater to your plants.
  • Water plants early in the morning to reduce evaporation.
  • If you use an evaporative cooler, reduce the flow of bleed-off water discharged, and use it to irrigate plants that are not sensitive to the salts. 
  • Turn off automatic watering systems when it rains, or install a rain sensor or smart controller to do this automatically. 
  • Protect your home from wildfires (which are more common during drought) by making sure that any plants located near the house are more widely-spaced and lower-growing than those farther away.

 

Community Water System Map

The Community Water Systems (CWS) Interactive Map provides a detailed look at all of the Community Water Systems and the areas they serve.  You have the option to search for a water system by using the search feature and entering the CWS Number (91-), ADEQ Number (AZ...), or the water system name.  Another option is to select the service area on the map, where a pop-up will open providing you with the details of that water system.  Some of the information provided in the pop-up includes: owner name, address, phone number, CWS number, ADEQ number and population of the service area.  If you select your Community Water System and find the information to be incorrect, please contact ADWR so we can update your records.

Resources

 

Events

There's a variety of classes and workshops available around the state that you can participate in to learn more about outdoor water conservation. Many of these events are free.